Resources

Let the discussions - and the progress begin.

Merriam-Webster defines resource as:
a: a source of supply or support : an available means—usually used in plural.
b: a natural source of wealth or revenue—often used in plural.
c: a natural feature or phenomenon that enhances the quality of human life.
d: computable wealth —usually used in plural.
e: a source of information or expertise.

In a discussion of land management, the first four apply.

For the purposes of this page, all five apply.

Here you will find a listing of our various natural resources: fisheries, forests, livestock, predators, rangelands, water management, waterfowl and wildlife (game and non-game).
These broad categories provide the organizational framework for additional information—a resource—about ongoing issues involving each. Taken from popular media, scientific journals and a myriad of other sources the information herein illustrates how singularly focused quick fixes are being applied to complicated natural systems across the country.

Arguably intentions are good. Generally the results are not.

We offer these articles, as well as some success stories, to prompt discussion and thought that moves our natural resource management efforts away from the status quo. In recent years, traditional land management efforts have sat on opposite ends of the spectrum, ranging from unsustainable chemical inputs, intensive industrialization and an unwavering devotion to eradication to benign neglect in the name of preservation.

Ironically, in the 21st century we need to return to the basics of past centuries. We should focus our attention on the big picture, which in nature is nuanced, and begin to work with her forces instead of against them. In Holistic Management, our decision-making framework of choice, the goal is balance through biodiversity.

Let the discussions—and the progress begin.

The objective of biodiversity conservation is to maintain viable native animal and plant populations of all kind.

The complex issue of biodiversity encompasses virtually all plants and animals at genetic, species, community, and landscape scales. We provide resources and our working insights on the topic across the following areas.

Fisheries

Fisheries, both freshwater and saltwater, serve as the proverbial canaries in the coal mine when it comes to water quality.

Rangelands

Rangelands act as nature’s factories, while also providing wildlife habitat and the viewsheds that lift the human spirit.

Forests

Native forests are as diverse as native rangelands or any other healthy ecosystem. Like rangelands, forests produce oxygen, sequester carbon, provide wildlife habitat and play a role in the water cycle.

Waterfowl

Waterfowl reflect the conditions of the land and the water across the North American continent. As they migrate from north to south and back again, they, depending on species, rely on a wide range of environments.

Livestock

Instead of being a threat, well-managed livestock can reinvigorate landscapes that have devolved into barren unproductivity, helping restore other essential ecological processes along the way.

Water Management

The quality and quantity of water available in America is directly correlated to the condition of the land.

Predators

When we look at nature’s big picture, we have to recognize the role predators play in the health of the natural world. True biodiversity must also include fangs and claws.

Wildlife

Wildlife are part of nature’s whole. To improve their future, we have to improve their habitat from the soil up.

Latest articles

Read more about the resources listed above:

How Beef Eaters in Cities Are Draining Rivers in the American West

Paraphrasing the authors below, “The biggest user of river water by far, is not lawns and showers, but agriculture. New research shows that across the Western United States, a third of all consumed water goes […]

Stewardship with Vision – Episode 5: David Spicer

Quoting the producers of the video below, “David Spicer’s leadership in restoring springs, wetlands, and riparian areas on his ranch and beyond has helped keep a species from being listed under the ESA and supported […]

On the Elk Trail: Episode 5 – Grizzly Bear Trail

Quoting the producers of the video below, “When we placed game cameras on an elk migration corridor near Yellowstone, we found many grizzly bears on the elk trail. Sometimes we were actually hiking in the […]

Winter Feeding Grounds for Elk in The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem Can Spread, or Be Used to Control, Disease

As discussed in this paper, winter feed grounds pose heath dangers to elk because of increased disease transmission. But they also could offer the best tool to treat brucellosis and other diseases, IF we were […]

Coronavirus Outbreak Shows The Risk in Ignoring Human Activity’s Impact on Nature

Paraphrasing the authors of the article below, “The role of healthy, intact ecosystems is being overlooked, together with the essential link between human, domestic animal and wildlife health. Biodiversity — the richness of life on […]

Mountain Goat Removal Temporarily Closes Areas Of Grand Teton National Park

According to the article below, the National Park Service (NPS) has decided to exterminate wild mountain goats in the Teton-Yellowstone Parks because they (1) are non-native, (2) “compete” with bighorn and (3) might infect them […]

On the Elk Trail: Episode 4 – “Spike”

Quoting the authors of this video, It’s migration season in Greater Yellowstone, and our trail cameras capture young male elk –  collectively nicknamed “Spike” – sparring and goofing off. These competitive behaviors prepare the spikes […]

Wolves Could Be Getting ‘too Comfortable Around Humans’ And Not Fearful Enough Of Roads Say Researchers After Two Pups Are Killed By A Car At Yellowstone National Park

As described below, wolves and bear in Yellowstone have lost their fear of humans.  This is bad for people – and worse for the animals.

On the Elk Trail: Episode 3 – Escape from Snow

Amazing trail camera footage captures how big game species in Wyoming migrate at different times because of their varying abilities to move through deep snow. Out of elk, moose, pronghorn and mule deer, which species […]

Sage Grouse Land Management Plan Changes

As described below, agency plans regarding Sage Grouse management have been changed to enable local stakeholders to determine what strategies to implement where and how while still conserving sage grouse habitat.

The Resistance to Holistic Wildlife Management

Across the West as well as in Texas, agencies, universities, governmental and conservation organizations resist holistic wildlife and agricultural management practices. Most Western public grazing rules make holistic grazing very difficult if not impossible  In this […]

Costs that Discouraged Rotational Grazing Practices on the USA’s Great Plains

As discussed in the paper below, the expenses of fencing and water improvements are barriers to planned grazing. The authors suggest ways to overcome these.

Nature Up Close: The Bighorn Sheep of Yellowstone

Read the article below for wonderful photos and video of Yellowstone Bighorn.

On the Elk Trail: Episode 2 – Elk Migration

In 2018, a biologist and a filmmaker used camera traps to film the entire fall migration of an elk herd in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem of western Wyoming. During the project’s first week a snowstorm […]

All About The Cocker Spaniel

“Since it is impossible to say which are better – labs or cockers – the correct choice is both.

Massive Juniper Tree-Cutting Project Aims to Aid Sage Grouse

According to the article below: “Overall, sage grouse numbers have dwindled from an estimated 16 million before European settlement of the West to no more than 500,000 today in 11 western states. The project that […]

Deer Culling Does Not Improve Deer: Common Sense Habitat Management Does

In a landmark 13-year study based on 15,000 animal trappings, the Comanche (Farias) Ranch near Eagle Pass, Texas, has proven that culling of so-called “inferior” bucks, including spikes, does not increase antler size in wild […]

Late 2019 Fall River Fish Numbers Available

Fish populations in the upper Fall River, above and below Pitchstone Waters Ranch, were surveyed in the summer of 2019, as reported below.  

Did the IPCC Say We Must Quit Eating Meat?

The climate activists are widely reporting that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has  declared that we all have to be vegetarians.  But is that true?   As quoted below, IPCC’s 107 climate-change gurus recently […]

Stewardship with Vision – Episode 2: Malpai Borderlands Group

In the high desert of southern Arizona and New Mexico, almost a million acres of important habitats and nearly 30 at-risk species are being protected and conserved…by a coalition of ranchers who manage from “The […]

New Numbers Show Conservation Soil-Tilling Method as Profitable as Conventional Ways

Conservation soil tillage is a proven farming practice that would work great around Pitchstone Waters in Idaho’s Teton Valley. As the authors describe, conservation tillage involves less work and produces more profit for farmers. In […]